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Thread: Topstyler

  1. #11
    Hipster Doofus Array Laura's Avatar
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    I'd like to try these.


  2. #12
    Member Array Tornerose's Avatar
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    Those look like fun... They're based on heat though, so I seriously doubt there's no damage.. Either that or the "study" they did was flawed and biased.

    But compared to most other heat rollers out there, it looks pretty cool. I like that it clips, wich means it will probably stay put even on the most slippery hair. But will i hold all the lenght of some of the users on this board?
    I'd imagine someone like Titian with long thick hair would either need ALOT of clips and supertiny sections, or t would all fall out due to weight?

    Zandy, Angel & T°fflus
    "Who can believe that there is no soul behind those luminous eyes!" ~ Theophile Gautier

  3. #13
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    I'm guessing that if you have extremely long and/or thick hair, smaller sections would be the way to go. Although, with a spring clip mechanism it would seem that there is a reasonable amount of leeway in how large a section of hair it holds. There are also two sizes of clips, one for smaller amounts of hair and one for larger amounts of hair.

    I'm hoping to receive one soon to give it a try. Although I would agree, that heat styling is always somewhat damaging I think that some items do far less damage than others.

    Although I've eschewed flat irons and curling irons, I'm willing to use a blow dryer, Caruso steam rollers and flocked hot rollers at times and they don't seem to do any obvious damage to my hair. The downside is that I just can't get the kind of curls I would like with Caruso or hot rollers. Something about the steam makes my hair a bit frizzy and the curl is not as strong as I would like it to be. I'm hoping that this item might be just what I'm looking for, a fast, tight and smooth curl with minimal damage.

    Anyway, I'll let you know once it arrives and I have a chance to play around with it.
    Last edited by aMused; May 6th, 2011 at 03:15 PM.

  4. #14
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    My Topstyler arrived today.

    Let the experiments begin!

  5. #15
    Hipster Doofus Array Laura's Avatar
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    oh oh oh! Tell us all about them.... and post pix!

    What ones did you get? and where did you get them?

  6. #16
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    I got the ones you see listed in my first post from the website.

    That is the only place you can get them right now.

    I've got exactly what you see when you check out the website.

    My first impression is quite favorable. The clamshell clips are much lighter in weight than I had expected since they have ceramic plates inside. This is a good thing, you don't want those to be heavy and pulling on your hair. It has a decent guide to give you ideas on how to use it and how to achieve various looks.

    There is always a big of a learning curve when trying out a new method of curling hair. How to hold the hair, roll the hair, etc. Especially in the back where you can't see. But I think once I play around and master a technique that works well for me, the Topstyler could very well fire my hot-rollers and curling-iron (if I still used one of those) for a quick, easy set.

  7. #17
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    Okay, I've had a chance to play with the Topstyler.

    First I'll begin with ease of use. The main way the Topstyler works is to simultaneously heat and hold the curl you form with your fingers or with the 2 prong combs that come with the styler if you prefer. If you are used to forming pincurls, you're already ahead of the game. Unlike conventional rollers where you start with the end of the hair and curl towards the root, you actually start rolling the hair around your finger(s)/comb at the root of the hair, coiling the hair around until you come to the end. Then you slip the finger(s)/comb out, while pinching the curl and then apply the clamshell to the curl. It's a pretty forgiving method even if you're not used to making pincurls starting at the root. There's a nice manual that shows different ways to form the curl to get different effects, such as varying the direction of the curl, the number of fingers and even the way you wind the curl. I did a quick, rough, large curl for body and lift just to give it a go last night and the results were quite satisfactory for a first run.

    Since I didn't want to keep re-heating and curling my own hair while I experimented, I pulled out my handy hairdresser's head to try out some different techniques while watching television. It also help me to work on my technique without tiring myself by trying it over and over on my own head. I tried all the various curls on the dummy head and I found that I could do a few things on the dummy that I wouldn't be able to do as nicely on my own head because my dummy head has hair that is 29" (from hairline over head to ends) and a natural taper, while my own hair is just over 20" with a fairly blunt hemline. What I noticed is that it is quite easy to adapt to more or less hair by adjusting the size of the hair section as well as the size of clamshell used. One method of forming the curl that I really like for longer lengths is to use 2 fingers and wrap the hair in a figure-8 pattern. This gives a wonderful 'S' wave on long hair. You can also twist the hair before forming a curl and get yet another effect.

    If you are accustomed to using regular rollers and have no experience forming pincurls, you'll want to practice it a bit. And even if you don't have another person's head or a dummy head you can practice on, you can at least practice without heating the clamshells for a while. The tricky part is making sure you keep the curl coiled and that the ends don't escape until you apply the clamshell. I figured it out after just a few tries but I did need to play around to figure out the best finger hold and the right amount of tightness to roll the curl. Too loose and you can lose control of the curl, too tight and it's a bit difficult to remove the curl from the finger - that type of thing. Also I had to figure out how best to hold the curl while placing the clamshell on the curl. Although you won't burn yourself the same way you could on a curling iron (I've had blisters from accidentally touching my neck with one of those babies) I still think they're hot enough that you wouldn't want to accidentally clamp your finger with it.

    Heat damage. The claim is that this product doesn't cause damage from heat styling. All of you who have long term relationships with your hair (meaning super long lengths) knows that all heat styling causes damage, just as brushing, combing, washing or otherwise manipulating the hair. So technically, I would not agree that this styler causes no damage. However, when compared to other forms of heat styling I would say that it is one of the lesser damaging forms of heat styling. I don't believe it is nearly as damaging as most curling irons or flat-irons. It may be less damaging than most heated rollers as well, in fact, I would bet on that. The reason being, with a regular roller the heat is always concentrated on the hair that is closest to the hot roller. You have to build up a lot of heat in that roller in order for it to stay hot long enough for the heat to permeate all the hair on that roller. So the roots don't get any real heat at all while the ends get super heated again and again and again. And we all know the ends are the oldest, most frail sections of the hair. The clamp sandwiches the entire curl, with the heat concentrated on each side of the curl. The ceramic gets about as hot as most hot rollers but because the ceramic plate/cup isn't terribly thick and the section of hair isn't terribly thick, the heat permeates the entire curl quickly and the clamp cools more quickly as well. You only need to leave these in for about 1/2 the time you would leave in a heated roller for the same effect because they do cool more quickly. So as with all heat styling, you still need to be judicious in how often you use it depending on your own hair type, how long you want to grow your hair and how fragile you hair is but I think it is among the least damaging of all heat styling products out there. I certainly would have no issue using this on my hair for special occasions or quick styling.

    Overall styling effect. This is where this particular product really shines if you ask me. You can do just about anything you want with this styler. There is way more variety to the kinds of looks you can get and the look is far more natural. Also, there is no crease or mark like you can get with a lot of rollers. I'm totally in love with the natural curl. I forgot to mention that earlier that this morning I gave it another try on my own head. Last night I made a few large sections and formed the curls around two fingers. This morning I tried out using smaller sections and forming the curl around one finger. Just as I expected, I got amazing curliness and fullness and yet the curls looked very natural.

    The entire system is very compact and everything you need fits right in the case. The heating element is seated at the bottom and the cover has a pocket to hold the combs, extra clamshells, styling book, etc. So I love that everything you need fits in one case.

    The basic set comes with 10 large clamps and 10 smaller clamps. These clamps are pretty much interchangeable but it is nice to use the smaller ones around the face and at the neckline and the larger ones for the rest of the hair. If you have very short hair, I can see where you might want to buy additional small clamshells if you wanted to take more than 10 sections of hair because I think the large clamshells would not be as easy to use if your hair was only 3-4" from the root. And if you have very long hair (waist or longer), I can see where you might want to purchase some extra large clamshells if you feel that you need more than 10 for the longer sections of hair. At my length what comes with the set is just fine. I imagine the clamshells that come with the set would still work for me up to BSL.

    Anyway, this styler has fired my hot rollers (my SIL is happy to take them) and if I still used a curling iron, it would fire that too. A curling iron doesn't hold the shape of the curl until it's cool (unless you bother to pin each curl up as you go) and I think it gets a lot hotter in order to do it's job, so I consider a curling iron more damaging while giving less hold. Hot rollers are not as versatile in the type of curl you can form, they're heavy to wear and you have to keep them in for about twice as long for the same effect.

    This product isn't inexpensive, it's true. But when you consider what it does and the stylers it replaces, I think you might prefer to put your money into one of these. I'm kinda hoping that as this item becomes more popular that it can be sold in stores and possibly come down in price a bit as well. I also would like to learn how you can order more clamshells if you want, say 5 more in a particular size. But for the average user, this probably is not going to be an issue. It's not an issue for me now and probably won't be for several years . . . but I'm anal that way, I want to know how I can get extras if I want them.

  8. #18
    Member Array Tornerose's Avatar
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    Do you think they would work well without the heat? Like regular rollers? Or would they feel too heavy against the head for the amoun of hours it would take to dry waistlenght and longer hair?

    Zandy, Angel & T°fflus
    "Who can believe that there is no soul behind those luminous eyes!" ~ Theophile Gautier

  9. #19
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    Using these clips without heat would be like using hot-rollers without heat. They might work, a little, but not as well as something designed to be used on damp hair and it would be a total waste of the design.

    If you wanted a similar effect with damp hair you would be better off using sectioning clips, bobby pins or some other way to clip the hair that would allow the air to get to the hair and dry it out.

    This is a great tool for those times when you really don't have time for a wet/damp set - which is the ideal way to set your hair if you really want to make sure to minimize damage. But I think as far as heat styling, this is one of the lesser damaging tools out there.

    I've avoided most heat styling for the past few years because either the tool was too damaging (flat-iron, curling iron) or it didn't truly give me the effect I was going for (hot rollers). So I was left with trying to do damp sets with rag style rollers and/or damp bunning. This has worked nicely for me but it's not very good for 'on the go'. It requires advance planning.

    I found that I can take about 4-6 large sections with this and get a great 'bun wave' effect in just a few moments with some nice volume and body. This is really nice even if I want to wear my hair up because I really hate it when I pin my hair up and it looks too flat to the head. The look is too severe for my taste. So if I can get some volume first I can also get a looser bun that looks bigger and the whole updo is softer.

    I'm at such an awkward length for wearing my hair down that I will rarely do it unless I can curl it somehow. I think BSL or longer would be nice but first I've got to find APL - which I should attain by the end of summer/beginning of fall. Grow hair! Grow!!!

  10. #20
    Hipster Doofus Array Laura's Avatar
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    Thank you for the awesome review! It sounds like I may have to get one if I decide to have long layers, bangs cut in at some point.


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